Rewarding Relevance — How Facebook Got it Right

If relevance had a higher place in the social order, we can speculate that we would be less likely to bore each other with self-serving or innocuous banter, like the weather or what we had for breakfast.

People would undoubtedly show more regard for each other. And in order to achieve that they would need to listen better. They would need to understand where the other person was coming from so they could engage in discourse that was more inclusive.

Who knows? We might even be less reliant on our mobile devices, which afford us the ability to select information and entertainment that seems to continually hold out the possibility of conveying something more interesting or relevant than anything a friend might say — which might explain why a group of people sitting together at a table in Starbucks seem more attentive to their iPhones than each other!!

I seldom consult my old analog edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, but it’s interesting to note that the word “relevate” comes directly after relevant.

Relevate? It’s an obsolete word that means, “to raise the spirits of a person; to restore to cheerfulness.” Isn’t that part of the magic that can immediately arise for the friend or person for whom one is being relevant? It raises them up — it relevates — because it resonates with their being, with who they are as a person.

You’ve got to hand it to Facebook. They got relevance right. Perhaps that should not be too much of a surprise because, in many respects, Facebook is in the relevance business. To encourage greater relevance among their advertisers (albeit with the goal of not alienating their subscriber base) Facebook developed what is called a Relevance Score.

Here’s how it works. If your ad scores high based on Facebook’s algorithm it means your post is resonating with the target audience and there is a greater likelihood that it is performing well. If your Relevance Score is low it means your advertising is probably missing the mark and you might as well be talking to a polar bear about yoga outfits.

With the advent of Relevance Scores, Facebook encourages advertisers to think smarter about tailoring their messages to their intended audience. And with advertising costs rising, achieving higher relevance scores has become even more relevant to advertisers.

Ultimately, promoting relevance is a win-win-win. Advertisers can save money because they are rewarded by creating more relevant ads. Users are exposed to third-party content that they are more predisposed to welcome and respond to. And Facebook protects their users, and ultimately their business, from content that seems intrusive or superfluous.

Minds+Motives, in case you haven’t noticed, is also in the relevance business. That is why we are pleased to announce…

Motivational Data is available on Facebook — FREE!

It’s been our mission for nearly a decade to bring more relevance to advertising through a deeper understanding of what makes something relevant to an individual in the first place. That is why Motivational Data is a natural fit on Facebook. And advertisers can now access our data at no charge.

If you have a Facebook advertising account, go here to have Motivational Data pushed to your account via Acxiom Data Guru. It will take 2-3 days to load. There is no minimum spend and no commitment. Small businesses throughout the country are discovering that, applied wisely, Motivational Data is a great way to boost Relevance Scores and lower costs per click or impressions.

The time is near when all businesses will be in the relevance business. Minds+Motives is thrilled to be part of this evolution. And we’re happy to support you if you want to learn more about how you can bring greater relevance to every part of your business.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: